10 Saddest Queen Songs That Will Make You Cry

Saddest Queen Songs
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It’s no question that Queen has a discography that never gets old, but it’s true that some songs are more popular than others. The group has done a fantastic job of conveying emotions in their own unique way through their music.

Depending on what you’re in the mood for, there’s a good chance Queen has something that’ll fit the bill. 

In this article, I’m going to explore the 10 saddest queen songs from their career!

1. Days of our Lives

With many layers of organic instrumentation and soft synths, “Days of our Lives” is a nostalgic record that’ll get you lost in your thoughts and feelings. The vocals are smooth, and it tells a great story that’s easily relatable for many people.

It speaks about love and the many unexpected challenges that come with it, and the instrumental follows with a sentimental tone to match. Many listeners hold this record dear to their hearts, and it’s easy to see why due to the song’s qualities.

2. The Show Must Go On

Starting off with cinematic dynamics, the song prepares you for a journey, and the reverberated vocals only add to that energy. “The Show Must Go On” is one of the saddest Queen songs, as it perfectly utilizes emotional dynamics to drive the story.

The vocals are beyond powerful, and the instrumentation features strong electric guitars and booming percussion. With the diversity the track provides, it provides an experience that can be pretty overwhelming.

3. Made in Heaven

Part of what makes Queen’s music so good is their ability to deliver emotion in a unique and powerful way. This song is a great blend of elements that bring power and the pace of a slow jam that’s perfect for a slow dance with a significant other.

Although the percussion stays relatively consistent, you can’t ignore the waves of emotions the song goes through. Even if certain parts seem to contradict themselves, they all combine fluidly without seeming out of place.

4. Mother Love

The intro melodies feature a melancholic electric guitar that hits the soul, and other instrumentation slowly layers in to build up a stellar experience. I feel “Mother Love” is one of the saddest Queen songs by far, as the lyrics come with an unfiltered approach that forces listeners to look at the reality of the topic.

Throughout the record, the dynamics in the production continue to reach new heights, and there are many parts that focus heavily on the instrumentation alone. As usual, the record comes with a symphonic sound that allows you to sink into the experience it has to offer.

5. No One But You (Only The Good Die Young)

With a strong piano melody that carries most of the track, this record takes a more simplistic approach where the vocals take center stage. The percussion is pretty dynamic as it offers many unique variations, and the main melodies match the energy and strength of the vocals.

Throughout the record, there are a few riffs from other instruments here and there to add some variety, and they lead the ear into the next powerful vocal. Of course, all of the energy gets put into the hook for a grand dynamic that’s chilling in itself.

6. Love of my Life

This track includes many more acoustic elements that carry a very touching sound. Without a doubt, the message is quite relatable to many people as life comes with many trials that can be hard to escape, and the message will be relevant for generations down the road.

“Love of my Life” is a song that’s dedicated to a very human experience, and this is partly why many people latched onto it ever since it was released. This timeless piece of music will always be relevant no matter how much time passes.

7. You Take My Breath Away

This is another song that shows the prowess of the vocals, and the instrumentation that soon follows is just a cherry on top. You won’t ever get over a record like this as it brings a genuine sound that anybody can appreciate.

Aside from the vocals, a very emotional piano melody carries the record for the most part. “You Take My Breath Away” is a track that won’t ever lose its touch, and its simple instrumentation is more than enough to get the message across.

8. Who Wants To Live Forever

With a long, building introduction, this record slowly inches forward by adding new dynamics that match the direction of the story. It’s a great example of how instrumentation is supposed to be written, and the lyrics blend with the direction of each melody.

The song also features looming percussion that booms in the background, and each new melody add to the production’s progression. Even if you aren’t a huge fan of Queen’s music, this is a song that’ll make an impression for a lifetime.

9. All Dead, All Dead

A touching and melancholic record, the piano melody really sells a lot of the emotion the song has to offer. The range and dynamics in the vocals are equally as impressive, and the track is perfectly mixed.

I’d say this is one of the saddest Queen songs on this list, as the lyrics are relatively grim. Yet, the song goes through waves of emotions and dynamics that pull you from one side to the other for a full-fledged listening experience.

10. Too Much Love Will Kill You

Synth melodies that float in the backdrop of passionate vocals, “Too Much Love Will Kill You” offers a clear message and instrumentation that’s built for storytelling that’ll pull at your heartstrings.

The hook of this record brings everything full circle for a very dynamic approach, and it has plenty of replayability. This record is a fan favorite for many people, and like a lot of Queen’s records, it’ll continue to be appreciated for years to come.

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